Janet Packer

REVIEWS OF CONCERT PERFORMANCES

"An incisive and deeply thoughtful violinist."

—Milwaukee Sentinel

"Bountiful poise and expressive vibrancy... models of cohesion and warmth."

—Cleveland Plain Dealer

"She is a fine violinist who invests her playing with sure-fingered technique and plenty of confidence as well as a pleasingly big, robust sound."

—Omaha World Herald

"Packer played (Andrew Imbrie's Soliloquy) magnificently. Working from memory (as she did throughout the evening), she revealed an opulent tone, a swashbuckling bow arm, meticulous intonation, and a keen sense of gesture. Her playing was theatrical, not in the easy sense that brings to mind "theatrics," but in the sense of a master teller of tales or a wizard of stagecraft."

—San Francisco Classical Voice

"In Bach's Partita for unaccompanied violin (BWV 1004) Packer was, among other things, blessedly instructive. Goodness, how do you energize those long chains of equal-value notes that can look so intimidating in score and so often numbingly mishandled in performance? And be subtle about it? She'll tell you. In the concluding Ciaconna, the stylistic concentration and austerely beautiful sound had you wishing it would go on longer."

—Boston Globe

"The ‘heart and soul’ of (Krzysztof Meyer’s Imaginary Variations) resided in Meyer’s imaginative approaches to rhetoric and the expressiveness that Packer brought to his inventions. This made for highly satisfying listening.” Read the full review

—San Francisco Classical Music
   Examiner

"(In Schubert's Fantasie, D. 934) she abounded in what the French would call netteté, which is a sort of distinct elegant preciseness there's no surplus of in this world."

—Boston Globe

"An absorbing recital... (Havergal Brian's Legend) was fervently played and made a considerable effect ... Busoni's massive Second Sonata, Op. 36a proved a high point of this concert and the season. Packer had full grasp of the work's structure, perfectly judged tempi and tempo relationships, and played with total technical command.

—The Strad